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Friday, October 3, 2014

Free Online Photo Collage Makers

Free Online Photo Collage Makers
Creating photo collages has never been this easy now that free tools are available online. There’s no need for you to manually create it in Photoshop by using several layers anymore because online photo editors are now equipped with an easy option to create an instant collage. However we’ve only found 5 sites that offer this kind of photo editing option. What are these sites? Scroll down for more information.


This new online photo editor now offers different layouts for you to choose from. Currently the free layouts include Ducks in a Row which is good for 2 to 5 photos, Square Deal for 4, 9, 16 and 25 photos, Biggie Smalls for 3 to 6 photos and the L-egant for 5, 8, 10, 12 photos. Premium layouts include Pinter-etsy, Tile Border, Jigsaw and the FB cover which is ideal for creating cover photos on your Facebook profile. However the premium layouts are not yet locked and can be used for free so you might want to take advantage of this feature before they offer it for premium users.


Aside from being an impressive online photo editor, Fotoflexer also allows creating photo collages with as 25 photos on it. The notable feature of the collage editor is that you can choose to add a selection effects to either just one photo or to the entire collage that you’re making. There are a number of collage layouts that you can configure according to your preferences. You can change the background color or even set it to transparent if you wish. Spacing between photos are also allowed and you can set them from 0 to 70 pixels. Proportions can also be adjusted so the pictures would fit on the layout that you selected and you won’t have to worry if you have photos of different orientations. Whether it’s a landscape or portrait photo, the photos would perfectly fit and fill-up the collage.


Photovisi  is another online photo collage maker but this one offers a more interesting way to collage your pictures which is perfect of you’re into creating scrapbooks. There’s a variety of templates to choose from and you can even add a background color or photo if you wish to. You won’t have problems navigating the site and tweaking your collage because the process is done by just 3 easy steps: You simply select a template, upload the photos and download the collage. You can arrange, resize, crop and even rotate images to make it more personalized.


Picture2life  is a fairly simple and easy to use online collage maker that features 20 fully customizable collage templates. There’s a an all-new selection of customization features that you can tweak such as the canvassing, cropping, and even applying various effects to the entire collage. Uploading photos is now easier as it takes advantage of the HTML5 features so you can simply drag and drop the photos directly into the selected template.


5. Fotonea
Just like Photovisi, Fotonea is also very simple and easy to use for create collages. You just upload the photos, choose a desired background and click “create” to generate your collage. Fotonea however is only limited to 6 images only. If you want to add more photos, you need to pay a small premium of $1 for a maximum number of 20 photos.

About the author
Alvin Sabay is an SEO Link Builder and a freelance content writer covering topics about web design tools and anything related to web design.

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Google Unveils Project Wing Air Drone Delivery System (Video)


by: Joseph On  Friday, August 29, 2014
Tags:  Air Drone Delivery   Google   Project Wing  
Project Wing
In case you thought Amazon was alone in working on a system for automated high-speed air delivery, Googlerecently unveiled Project Wing, their own entry into the field.
Unlike Amazon’s automated delivery service, Google’s Project Wing was developed mostly with emergency supplies (like food, water, or medicine) in mind. In fact, the project originated as a way to get emergency defibrillators to heart attack sufferers on short notice, before this avenue was abandoned due to complications involving 9-1-1 and other public emergency services.
Now, the sky is basically the limit on what Google plans to do with Project Wing, but whatever it is will have to go through a lengthy legal process given the current amount of regulation on United States skies currently on the books. But if any company could ever get around or help to change those regulations, it’s Google.
You can check out the official introduction to Google’s Project Wing in the video below. Stay tuned for more on Project Wing as it develops.

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How Alibaba's Jack Ma Became the Richest Man in China

SEPTEMBER 23, 2014



English teacher and Internet entrepreneur Jack Ma founded Alibaba 15 years ago in his tiny apartment in Hanzhou, China. On Friday, Ma became the richest man in China on the heels of the biggest IPO in U.S. and possibly world history.
With a market cap of $231 billion, the online retailer is nearly as valuable as Wal-Mart and bigger than Amazon and eBay combined.
And this is just the beginning. Alibaba plans to expand aggressively in America and Europe and has already invested nearly $1 billion in a host of U.S.-based startups, including Uber, Lyft, ShopRunner, Fanatics, Tango and Kabam.    
Every current and aspiring entrepreneur and business leader should learn from how a Chinese English teacher turned a vision, a group of friends and $60,000 into untold riches and the world's most valuable Internet commerce company. It will no doubt be studied in business schools for generations.
Start here, go anywhere. Recognizing the importance of English, young Ma would ride his bike to a nearby hotel and guide foreigners around the city just to learn and practice the language. His passion for entrepreneurship in many ways parallels Masayoshi Son who grew up poor, followed his dream to Silicon Valley and graduated from U.C. Berkeley before founding Softbank. As chairman of Softbank and Sprint, Son is now the richest man in Japan.
He had vision … and he had help. Ma saw the Internet’s enormous potential to bridge businesses across China’s huge population early on. So he and his wife brought 17 friends together and pooled $60,000 to start the company. That formed the basis for the company’s dynamic partnership structure and unique culture designed to drive collaboration, diminish bureaucracy and promote accountability for long-term growth.   
Go big or go home. Even if crowdfunding existed when Alibaba was founded, I doubt if Ma would have gone that route. He’s simply not a “dip your toe in the water” kind of guy. Instead he and his friends went all in, raising a $5 million angel round, $20 million from Softbank in 2000, $1 billion from Yahoo five years later, and $1.6 billion from Silver Lake Partners and DST Global in 2011. That’s how you make it big.   
Big problems lead to big opportunities. China’s lack of brick and mortar infrastructure has always been an insurmountable hurdle for the enormous nation’s small business merchants. Alibaba solved that and now accounts for 80% of the country’s ecommerce – a whopping $248 billion last year and more than twice that of Amazon.
Innovation comes from unique individuals who think and act differently. Everyone talks about changing the world and making tons of money these days, but those who actually do it are exceptional individuals with breakthrough ideas, uncommon vision and a passion to do great work. Disruptive innovation comes from people who break from the status quo and carve their own path.
Stand on the shoulders of giants ... but learn from their mistakes. Like Amazon and eBay, Alibaba is an Internet commerce company, but that’s where the similarity ends. Alibaba does not actually hold inventory or sell goods. It’s a middleman that collects annual fees and commissions from larger merchants and advertising fees from smaller ones. The result is one of the most scalable and profitable business models on Earth.
What’s in a name? Less than you think. Apple. Facebook. Google. Microsoft. Uber. One Kings Lane. Fanatics. Starbucks. Whole Foods. What do the names and brands of all these companies have in common? Absolutely nothing. Some are conjunctions or made-up words. Others are common words or phrases. There’s even a fruit. It’s what your business does for customers that counts … not your name or personal brand.
Jack Ma was sitting in a San Francisco coffee shop when he thought of how Ali Baba overheard the secret password of The 40 Thieves -- “open sesame” -- and unlocked untold riches. It resonated with his vision of unlocking the potential of China’s small and midsized merchants. Now you know the secret of how he accomplished his dream.  







English teacher and Internet entrepreneur Jack Ma founded Alibaba 15 years ago in his tiny apartment in Hanzhou, China. On Friday, Ma became the richest man in China on the heels of the biggest IPO in U.S. and possibly world history.
With a market cap of $231 billion, the online retailer is nearly as valuable as Wal-Mart and bigger than Amazon and eBay combined.
And this is just the beginning. Alibaba plans to expand aggressively in America and Europe and has already invested nearly $1 billion in a host of U.S.-based startups, including Uber, Lyft, ShopRunner, Fanatics, Tango and Kabam.    
Every current and aspiring entrepreneur and business leader should learn from how a Chinese English teacher turned a vision, a group of friends and $60,000 into untold riches and the world's most valuable Internet commerce company. It will no doubt be studied in business schools for generations.
Start here, go anywhere. Recognizing the importance of English, young Ma would ride his bike to a nearby hotel and guide foreigners around the city just to learn and practice the language. His passion for entrepreneurship in many ways parallels Masayoshi Son who grew up poor, followed his dream to Silicon Valley and graduated from U.C. Berkeley before founding Softbank. As chairman of Softbank and Sprint, Son is now the richest man in Japan.
He had vision … and he had help. Ma saw the Internet’s enormous potential to bridge businesses across China’s huge population early on. So he and his wife brought 17 friends together and pooled $60,000 to start the company. That formed the basis for the company’s dynamic partnership structure and unique culture designed to drive collaboration, diminish bureaucracy and promote accountability for long-term growth.   
Go big or go home. Even if crowdfunding existed when Alibaba was founded, I doubt if Ma would have gone that route. He’s simply not a “dip your toe in the water” kind of guy. Instead he and his friends went all in, raising a $5 million angel round, $20 million from Softbank in 2000, $1 billion from Yahoo five years later, and $1.6 billion from Silver Lake Partners and DST Global in 2011. That’s how you make it big.   
Big problems lead to big opportunities. China’s lack of brick and mortar infrastructure has always been an insurmountable hurdle for the enormous nation’s small business merchants. Alibaba solved that and now accounts for 80% of the country’s ecommerce – a whopping $248 billion last year and more than twice that of Amazon.
Innovation comes from unique individuals who think and act differently. Everyone talks about changing the world and making tons of money these days, but those who actually do it are exceptional individuals with breakthrough ideas, uncommon vision and a passion to do great work. Disruptive innovation comes from people who break from the status quo and carve their own path.
Stand on the shoulders of giants ... but learn from their mistakes. Like Amazon and eBay, Alibaba is an Internet commerce company, but that’s where the similarity ends. Alibaba does not actually hold inventory or sell goods. It’s a middleman that collects annual fees and commissions from larger merchants and advertising fees from smaller ones. The result is one of the most scalable and profitable business models on Earth.
What’s in a name? Less than you think. Apple. Facebook. Google. Microsoft. Uber. One Kings Lane. Fanatics. Starbucks. Whole Foods. What do the names and brands of all these companies have in common? Absolutely nothing. Some are conjunctions or made-up words. Others are common words or phrases. There’s even a fruit. It’s what your business does for customers that counts … not your name or personal brand.
Jack Ma was sitting in a San Francisco coffee shop when he thought of how Ali Baba overheard the secret password of The 40 Thieves -- “open sesame” -- and unlocked untold riches. It resonated with his vision of unlocking the potential of China’s small and midsized merchants. Now you know the secret of how he accomplished his dream.  

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Thursday, October 2, 2014

16 Women Entrepreneurs Who Are Changing The Way Business Is Done In The Arab World

Arab Women Rising, published in 2014 by the Wharton Business School, profiles female entrepreneurs from around the Middle East and North Africa.

posted on Oct. 1, 2014, at 2:26 a.m.
Authors Nafeesa Syeed and Rahilla Zafar roamed the Middle East and North Africa in search of something common but often overlooked: Successful female entrepreneurs. In their 2014 book, Arab Women Rising, published by the Wharton Business School, Syeed and Zafar profile just 35 of the hundreds of innovative women they interviewed. Coming from diverse background and fields, the women shared their candid insight and personal stories about how they’ve made it in volatile business environments where female faces have often been made to feel unwelcome.
Here are samples of 16 of the stories profiled in Arab Women Rising: 35 Entrepreneurs Making a Difference in the Arab World:

1. Deena Fadel: “Work is not work for me. It’s a passion. It’s love.”

Deena Fadel: “Work is not work for me. It’s a passion. It’s love.”
Arab Women Rising
Deena Fadel, an Egyptian artist, quit her job at an advertising agency to start her own home accessories line, Joude. She takes inspiration from Cairo’s crowded streets, integrating traditional Arab motifs and calligraphy into every usable items, from coasters to pillows. 

2. Asma Mansour: “We have to think of how to solve social problems and to push the economy for growth.”

Asma Mansour: “We have to think of how to solve social problems and to push the economy for growth.”
Arab Women Rising
During the Tunisian Revolution in 2011, Asma Mansour found herself asking: How does one fight for social change in a sustainable way? Mansour researched several models, and subsequently co-founded the Tunisian Center for Social Entrepreneurship, a social innovation incubator that offers fellowships to those with new ideas.

3. Dana Al Taji: “Why not play around with it?”

Dana Al Taji: "Why not play around with it?"
Arab Women Rising
When Palestinian designer Dana Al Taji started to wear the Abeeya, a full length black cloak, she felt constricted by the options. So Al Taji took to Facebook and started her own line, called LAYAL, and now has her own boutique in Cairo. 

4. Jalila Tamallah: “I would like to provide for my kids, so they can have a future. I don’t want them to have a hard life, as my husband and I did. That’s the future and that’s what makes me work.”

Jalila Tamallah: “I would like to provide for my kids, so they can have a future. I don’t want them to have a hard life, as my husband and I did. That’s the future and that’s what makes me work.”
Arab Women Rising
Tunisian Jalilah Tamallah dropped out of school when she was younger to go work on a farm. Now she and her husband run a flower-farming business on that very same land. They started off using microloans to support the endeavor. 

5. Dr. Yasmin Altwaijri: “Confiding to someone that you’re take antidepressants, for instance, isn’t something people often talk about, even in urban areas, so I would imagine in rural areas the shrouding of mental illness is even more pronounced.”

Dr. Yasmin Altwaijri: “Confiding to someone that you’re take antidepressants, for instance, isn’t something people often talk about, even in urban areas, so I would imagine in rural areas the shrouding of mental illness is even more pronounced.”
Arab Women Rising
Dr. Yasmin Altwaijri is one of Saudi Arabia’s most senior scientists and a pioneer in the study of obesity, diabetes, and mental health issues in her country. She hopes that her work can help to raise awareness about mental health issues and lower stigmas associated with the diseases. 

6. Esra’s Al-Shafei: “Our countries are praised for their ‘progress’ and ‘achievements,’ with no acknowledgement to who’s actually building this: workers working under deplorable conditions.”

Esra's Al-Shafei: "Our countries are praised for their 'progress' and 'achievements,' with no acknowledgement to who’s actually building this: workers working under deplorable conditions.”
Arab Women Rising
Bahraini Esra’s Al-Shafei is a leading Internet activist in the Middle East. She requested not to show her face publicly for security reasons due to the Bahraini government’s restrictions on media and political freedoms. Now based in Bahrain, she is the founder of Migrant-Rights, which works to improve conditions for domestic workers around the Middle East. Al-Shafei also created CrowdVoice.org, a crowdsourcing platform for gathering information on protests. 

7. Maali Alasousi: “Being socially aware and helping the poor and disadvantaged is something that’s part of our religion and what we’re obligated to do.”

Maali Alasousi: “Being socially aware and helping the poor and disadvantaged is something that’s part of our religion and what we’re obligated to do.”
Arab Women Rising
Kuwaiti Maali Alasousi studied in Egypt and the United States, and returned to Kuwait to start her own tourism company. Then a trip to Yemen in 2007 changed her life: Alasousi was so effected by the poverty she saw in Yemen that she decided to sell her company, move to Yemen, and start an NGO to work on a range of social projects. 

8. Yasmine El-Mehairy: “We face this problem, like when content comes from the West — it might be translated, but it’s not localized.”

Yasmine El-Mehairy: “We face this problem, like when content comes from the West — it might be translated, but it’s not localized.”
Arab Women Rising
Egyptian Yasmine El-Mehairy found herself frustrated that there was no online platforms that resonated with many mothers in the Middle East. So she created the pan-Arab parenting site SuperMama, which offers an array for information from pregnancy tips to cooking videos. El-Mehairy made sure that SuperMama is in Arabic and written and produced by Arabs. 

9. Heidi Belal: “The thing that really pushed me on was that now these people are getting a salary from me — what are they going to do if we close down?”

Heidi Belal: “The thing that really pushed me on was that now these people are getting a salary from me — what are they going to do if we close down?”
Arab Women Rising
Egyptian entrepreneur Heidi Belal co-founded the web development firm Code-Corner with her husband, and then went on start the baked goods producer Cookies ‘n More with her sister. Cookies ‘n More focuses on delicious but healthy options. In the early days of her companies, Belal had to shuffle between back and forth between her stovetop, laptop, and caring for her daughters.

10. Loula Zaklama: “… Small entrepreneurs are going to help the economy of this country. It is not the big guys; it is not the mega projects anymore. It’s this series of very small microentrepreneurs that is going to save this country.”

Loula Zaklama: “... Small entrepreneurs are going to help the economy of this country. It is not the big guys; it is not the mega projects anymore. It’s this series of very small microentrepreneurs that is going to save this country.”
Gary Dickinson / Via Arab Women Rising
Now in her 70s, Loula Zaklama was just one of a few women in business in Egypt a half-century ago. Back then her husband was in prison and she had two children to support, so she took over an advertising agency. Now the early entrepreneur runs Rada Research and Public Relations and works with multinational corporations. 

11. Nisreen Shocair: “If you looked at our business in the early 2000s, it was all about Western books, English-based music and movies, and then the younger generation that have become powerful consumers are saying, ‘No, I’d rather listen to my own music.”

Nisreen Shocair: “If you looked at our business in the early 2000s, it was all about Western books, English-based music and movies, and then the younger generation that have become powerful consumers are saying, ‘No, I’d rather listen to my own music.”
Arab Women Rising
Nisreen Shocair is President of Virgin Megastores MENA (Middle East and North Africa). Shocair is Syrian and currently based in Dubai. While at Virgin she has helped to transform the company into a leading entertainment brand in the region. 

12. Rasha Shehada: “My mother is the type of person that is eager to learn and was very supportive when my father wanted to start a business.”

Rasha Shehada: “My mother is the type of person that is eager to learn and was very supportive when my father wanted to start a business.”
Rasha Shehada beat out her brothers to take over the family business. Shehada’s family is Palestinian but lived in the United Arab Emirates. In 1997 her father started Diamond Line, which has since grown into a leading hotel supply distributor.

13. Randa Abdou: “I don’t see why we cannot compete and why we cannot be as big as multinationals. We just need self-confidence, that’s it.”

Randa Abdou: “I don’t see why we cannot compete and why we cannot be as big as multinationals. We just need self-confidence, that’s it.”
Arab Women Rising
Randa Abdou is the daughter of political activists and currently the CEO of Creative Lab Group, a housing marketing and advertisting firm. Abdou credits her family’s past activism with teaching her how to be fearless in the business world.

14. Rama Chakaki: “I’m pushing to make sure that women of my generation are starting to invest financially, but also invest socially and be able to kind of profile themselves and the people in their communities…”

Rama Chakaki: “I’m pushing to make sure that women of my generation are starting to invest financially, but also invest socially and be able to kind of profile themselves and the people in their communities..."
Sami Haven / Via Arab Women Rising
Syrian Rama Chakaki is the founder of BarakaBits, a “good news from Middle East” news site with a long-term focus on staying sustainable. The site’s content covers an array of social and cultural topics, raging from music education to gaming development. 

15. Sally Sabry: “Even before wearing niqab, I wanted to work. I mean it was in my mind; I wasn’t closed that I have to get married and sit at home or anything. I want to have a goal and make it, inshallah.”

Sally Sabry: “Even before wearing niqab, I wanted to work. I mean it was in my mind; I wasn’t closed that I have to get married and sit at home or anything. I want to have a goal and make it, inshallah .”
Arab Women Rising
Egyptian Sally Sabry co-founded Best Mums with a friend in 2006. They use local cotton and producers to make breastfeeding covers for women. Both Sabry and her co-founder, Doaa Zaki, wear a full body and face veil. They are proud that there work defies stereotypes associated with their dress. 

16. Yasmin Helal: “We developed a model that we called dream-driven development, which basically starts with asking the children what they want and then helping them figure out what they need in order to get there.”

Yasmin Helal: “We developed a model that we called dream-driven development, which basically starts with asking the children what they want and then helping them figure out what they need in order to get there.”
Future Vision Productions
Yasmin Helal is a former pro-basketball player and engineer. Now she’s founded and runs Educate-Me, an initiative in Cairo that works to improve education for underprivileged kids and redefine education. 
Adapted from Arab Women Rising: 35 Entrepreneurs Making a Difference in the Arab World by Nafeesa Syeed and Rahilla Zafar, published by Knowledge@Wharton, 2014

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